Recent News

November 06, 2020

The Center for Experimental Music and Intermedia (CEMI) and iARTA at the University of North Texas invites composers, sound artists and, intermedia creators across our campus and community to submit new or existing works for the virtual concerts Sonic Murals. Submitted works will be curated and selected by CEMI and IARTA personnel, with the assistance of CEMI Director, Panayiotis Kokoras. The concerts will take the form of a pre-recorded audiovisual stream available during the days of the conference and promoted through the companion web page.

As possible, we will also project the festival stream in some or all of the following installations:

  • Merrill Ellis Intermedia Theatre (MEIT) – outside wall projection with stereo audio
  • UNT College of Music Courtyard - 7.1 Meyer audio system and LED video wall
  • Other campus locations with stereo audio TBD

Drew Schnurr, Assistant professor in Composition and Media Arts, has collaborated with various music faculty and artist Jenny Okun to produce the Augmented Reality Concert Hall, an interactive app for tablets and smart devices that seeks to use augmented reality to create a unique interactive music experience. ARCH I, the first iteration of the project, utilizes a two-dimensional poster that is recognized by the app, which then allows the user to interact with pre-recorded videos of performers in modular musical performances.The interactive interface enables a unique performance of a selected piece, molded by the curiosity and creative agency of the listener in real time. By giving individual audience members limited control over their musical experience, Schnurr’s project subverts the traditional divisions of performer, composer, and audience and enables the audience member to assert themselves as a fundamental part of the creative process. 

Using compositions by Joseph Klein, Kirsten Broberg, Bruce Broughton, Sungji Hong, and Drew Schnurr, ARCH’s approach to musical structure is both modular and highly mutable, allowing users to control individual musicians in complex and interlocking layers. As the app populates the screen with performers, the user’s environment is augmented and transformed into a musical performance space. By using preexisting space and augmenting it with virtual performers, ARCH seeks to increase audience immersion and blur the binary between virtual space and physical reality. 

Future plans for ARCH include developing experiences for wearable AR devices that heighten this sense of immersion and enable more dynamic and varied musical experiences in a variety of spaces. Other avenues of exploration for ARCH II and beyond include utilizing three dimensional spaces, site-specific performances, and democratic audience experiences, where user data is collected and interpreted to dictate large-scale performances. 

Drew Schnurr serves as the project leader and artistic director of ARCH. Other major contributors include composition area graduate assistants Mike Smith, an early technical assistant and consultant; Jake Thiede, Unity programmer and technical assistant; and Rachel Whelan, video and audio production manager.Additional contributions were made by Gayatri Sravani, computer scientist and technical assistant. 

This flashing neon sign by Alicia Eggert cycles through the statements "All the light you see is from the past" and "All you see is past" before turning off completely. It speaks to the fact that light takes time to travel, so by the time it reaches your eyes, everything you are seeing is technically already in the past. Light from the moon left its surface 1.5 seconds ago; sunlight travels for 8 minutes and 19 seconds before it touches your skin. The farther out into space we look, the farther back in time we can see.

This sign's 1st edition is permanently installed on the roof of 2517 West Girard Avenue in Philadelphia.

The 2nd and 3rd editions have been included in the Amsterdam Light Festival (2018), Aurora: Future Worlds in Dallas (2018), and New Glass Now at the Corning Museum of Glass in New York (2019).

The Sonification of Solar Harmonics (SoSH) Project seeks to sonify and visualize data collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). The Sun is a resonant cavity for very low frequency acoustic waves, and just like a musical instrument, it supports a number of oscillation modes, also commonly known has harmonics. We are able to observe these harmonics by looking at how the Sun's surface oscillates in response to them. This research is being conducted in collaboration with Stanford University's SOLAR Center, the University of North Texas's Initiative for Advanced Research in Technology and the Arts, and the University of Nebraska at Omaha's School of Music. For more information, visit http://solar-center.stanford.edu/SoSH/.The Sonification of Solar Harmonics (SoSH) Project seeks to sonify and visualize data collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). The Sun is a resonant cavity for very low frequency acoustic waves, and just like a musical instrument, it supports a number of oscillation modes, also commonly known has harmonics. We are able to observe these harmonics by looking at how the Sun's surface oscillates in response to them. This research is being conducted in collaboration with Stanford University's SOLAR Center, the University of North Texas's Initiative for Advanced Research in Technology and the Arts, and the University of Nebraska at Omaha's School of Music. For more information, visit http://solar-center.stanford.edu/SoSH/.