Recent News

November 06, 2020

The Center for Experimental Music and Intermedia (CEMI) and iARTA at the University of North Texas invites composers, sound artists and, intermedia creators across our campus and community to submit new or existing works for the virtual concerts Sonic Murals. Submitted works will be curated and selected by CEMI and IARTA personnel, with the assistance of CEMI Director, Panayiotis Kokoras. The concerts will take the form of a pre-recorded audiovisual stream available during the days of the conference and promoted through the companion web page.

As possible, we will also project the festival stream in some or all of the following installations:

  • Merrill Ellis Intermedia Theatre (MEIT) – outside wall projection with stereo audio
  • UNT College of Music Courtyard - 7.1 Meyer audio system and LED video wall
  • Other campus locations with stereo audio TBD

This flashing neon sign by Alicia Eggert cycles through the statements "All the light you see is from the past" and "All you see is past" before turning off completely. It speaks to the fact that light takes time to travel, so by the time it reaches your eyes, everything you are seeing is technically already in the past. Light from the moon left its surface 1.5 seconds ago; sunlight travels for 8 minutes and 19 seconds before it touches your skin. The farther out into space we look, the farther back in time we can see.

This sign's 1st edition is permanently installed on the roof of 2517 West Girard Avenue in Philadelphia.

The 2nd and 3rd editions have been included in the Amsterdam Light Festival (2018), Aurora: Future Worlds in Dallas (2018), and New Glass Now at the Corning Museum of Glass in New York (2019).

The Sonification of Solar Harmonics (SoSH) Project seeks to sonify and visualize data collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). The Sun is a resonant cavity for very low frequency acoustic waves, and just like a musical instrument, it supports a number of oscillation modes, also commonly known has harmonics. We are able to observe these harmonics by looking at how the Sun's surface oscillates in response to them. This research is being conducted in collaboration with Stanford University's SOLAR Center, the University of North Texas's Initiative for Advanced Research in Technology and the Arts, and the University of Nebraska at Omaha's School of Music. For more information, visit http://solar-center.stanford.edu/SoSH/.The Sonification of Solar Harmonics (SoSH) Project seeks to sonify and visualize data collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). The Sun is a resonant cavity for very low frequency acoustic waves, and just like a musical instrument, it supports a number of oscillation modes, also commonly known has harmonics. We are able to observe these harmonics by looking at how the Sun's surface oscillates in response to them. This research is being conducted in collaboration with Stanford University's SOLAR Center, the University of North Texas's Initiative for Advanced Research in Technology and the Arts, and the University of Nebraska at Omaha's School of Music. For more information, visit http://solar-center.stanford.edu/SoSH/.

Melinda Levin's recent film directed and premiered in Mongolia and was featured on KERA PBS. Mongolia: Earth and Spirit, is a documentary on a Mongolian Tibetan Buddhist monk, and illustrates his commitment to ecological protection of the brittle landscape near the Siberian border.

This short documentary follows Tibetan Buddhist Lama Delgar Mondoon, a Monk whose surprising life straddles urban and rural, and being a monk with having a wife and children. He attempts to save the trees, sometimes literally one at a time. In this poetic, character-driven, documentary, we see the beautiful landscapes, the traditional ceremonies, and the interactions of the everyday people of Mongolia who are on the front lines of grassroots environmental change and stewardship.